Fitness

THE BASICS of Dieting and Exercise

Summer time is BACK AGAIN!! For some, this means family, friends, fun, and pool season. For others, unfortunately, it can mean fat, fat, and fat. We know how much shade tummy tub can throw on your summer plans, so for this week, we’re going to talk about some basics that involves weight-loss. If you are adamant about losing weight, we’ve collected some research that will help you get on your way. As always, we turn to our trusted resource, MERCK MANUALS, to assist us in helping you merc away those unwanted pounds.

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Listed below are some notable points we took from an article on weight-loss, written by Dr. Adrienne Youdim, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine; Associate Professor of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Cedars Sinai Medical Center.

ABOUT DIETING

-          Weight loss ultimately requires consuming fewer calories than the body uses, so therefore it is important to keep in mind that in order to lose weight, you’ll have to eat less and exercise more.

-          As people lose weight, the body starts using energy more efficiently (a mechanism to protect against starvation). This is why weight-loss is always an uphill battle.

-          One pound of body fat stores about 3,500 calories

-          People are usually advised to consume 500 to 1000 fewer calories per day to lose about 1 to 2 pounds per week

-          How much fat and weight are lost, even when the same number of calories is eliminated, varies a great deal from one person to another

-          Most conservative weight loss diets involve consuming at least 1,200 to 1,400 calories a day

-          When rapid weight loss is needed, fewer than 1,200 calories may be consumed, though this should be used only if prescribed and supervised by a doctor

-          Diet should contain enough essential nutrients, including protein, vitamins and minerals!

-          Consuming fewer than 800 calories is NOT RECOMMENDED

-          Weight loss diets should provide about the same volume of food, but less calories (less saturated fat and sugar and more fluids and fibers)

ABOUT EXERCISE

-          Vigorous walking burns about 4 calories per minute. That’s 240 calories in 1 hour.

-          Running can burn twice as many calories (about 6 to 8 calories per minute).

-          When at rest, muscle tissue burns more calories than fat tissue, which is why weight and resistance training is recommended to increase muscle to fat ratio and maintain weight-loss.   

Always remember to consult a doctor before making lifestyle or health related changes, especially if you have medical issues or in an older age group. For the full article, which includes general guidelines as well as analyses on different types of diets, please visit MERCK MANUALS.

Also, have you heard of our Sugar-Free Weight Loss Challenge? We’re giving away a free trip!!!

EarthWater Tip: Top 10 Fitness and Nutrition Tips For Older Adults

Today’s adults are living longer, healthier lives due in part to better fitness and nutrition programs. With the number of Americans 65+ expected to reach 20% of the U.S. population by 2050, exercise and diet is more important than ever. These tips can help older adults enhance overall wellness into their later years.

  1. Fight afternoon fatigue. Fatigue is a common problem among older adults, especially after lunch. Having a glass of water and a high-antioxidant food like a prune (recently shown to promote bone health) can revitalize the body and stimulate the mind.
  2. Exercise from the neck up. Keeping the brain active and fit is imperative to the health of older adults. Not only does it stave off memory-loss illnesses like Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, but it also fosters executive function. Try word games and recall exercises. For example, find five red objects during a walk in the neighborhood and recall them when back home.
  3. Pole walk. Walking poles allow for more balanced mobility than walkers or canes. Walking with poles engages the muscles of the upper torso, which increases upper-body strength and cardiovascular endurance. Consult a physician before making the switch to poles.
  4. Dine in duos. Those who share meals with others eat less than those who eat alone. This is an easy weight-loss tactic and one that fosters social interaction and engagement. While this is easy for those aging in community, older adults aging at home can plan to have meals with family or friends at least several times a week.
  5. Break routines. Routine limits brain stimulation. It can be as easy as introducing new foods or new ways of eating the same food. For example, replace canned peaches with freshly sliced ones. Also, try taking a different route to the grocery store or shopping center.
  6. Get Sole Support. As people age, the fat pads on the bottom of their feet compress, creating fatigue and pain. Consider wearing supportive shoes or inserting foot pads for better stability and comfort or socks that have extra padding and a wicking agent to keep feet dry and comfortable.
  7. Fats: Out with the bad, in with the good. Older adults with an increased genetic risk for dementia can reduce the risk by increasing the amount of omega-3 fatty acids in their diet. These fatty acids, found in fish, nuts, olive oil and green leafy vegetables, can reduce brain inflammation, a possible cause of Alzheimer’s disease.
  8. Decrease salt and increase your salsa. High blood pressure, which can lead to strokes and a significant decline in cognitive function, often increases with age. As adults get older, the sense of taste also fades, leading to a desire for more salt on food to enhance flavor. Decreasing salt intake by putting down the shaker and increasing exercise habits by shaking to a salsa beat will enhance cardio and cognitive health.
  9. Try a balancing act. In addition to exercises that build strength and improve flexibility and cardiovascular endurance, make sure to add balance activities to the daily routine. Good balance requires maintaining a center of gravity over the base of support. Tai chi, yoga, walking on challenging surfaces and water exercises all enhance overall balance.
  10. Dance like there’s no tomorrow. Older adults getting regular physical exercise are 60% less likely to get dementia. Exercise increases oxygen to the brain and releases a protein that strengthens cells and neurons. Dance involves all of the above plus the cerebral activity present in learning and memory.
  11. DRINK EARTHWATER! The benefits are out of this world and the taste is amazing. Learn more here: www.earthwater.com/benefits

Source

EarthWater Tip: BEST Bike Trails in Dallas

NATIONAL BIKE MONTH

May is National Bike Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists and celebrated in communities from coast to coast. Established in 1956, National Bike Month is a chance to showcase the many benefits of bicycling — and encourage more folks to giving biking a try.

Whether you bike to work or school; ride to save money or time; pump those pedals to preserve your health or the environment; or simply to explore your community, National Bike Month is an opportunity to celebrate the unique power of the bicycle and the many reasons we ride. 

With memorial day weekend around the corner, we've got some great local trails for you wellness aficionados to try!


Katy Trail

Dallas

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Privately funded and supported by the community, the historic Katy Trail is built on an old railroad line and has quickly become an iconic destination for the people of Dallas. 

Spring Creek Forest

Garland

Addison Circle Park

Addison

Bounded by Addison Road, Addison Circle Drive, Quorum Drive, and Festival Way, this 10-acre open space serves as the special event site for Addison's Taste Addison, Kaboom Town, Oktoberfest, and many other events throughout the year. The park features a pavilion, restrooms, public display fountains, water features, two stages, an impressive pergola, benches, and off-street parking. Perfect for your bike trail!

Cedar Ridge Nature Center

South Dallas

Trinity River Audubon Center

South Dallas

This 120-acre former dump has been completely transformed by the Audubon Society and the city of Dallas. They created wonderful wetlands that attract birds year round, and there are more than 4 miles of trails.

Spring Creek Nature Area

Richardson

Oak Point

Plano