Artificial Sweeteners: Ineffective Against Weight-Loss?

According to an article published by the Wall Street Journal, Dr. Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist and Professor at Yale University School of Medicine, has “stopped [his] daily habit of diet drinks and [is] slowly removing these substances from the rest of his diet.”

Photo Credit: https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/9027783/AP_777662400567.jpg

Photo Credit: https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/9027783/AP_777662400567.jpg

He continues, “Rather than help me maintain a healthy weight, they(artificial sweeteners) like aspartame may be doing exactly what we thought they should be preventing. At the very least, they do not seem to help people keep weight off.” “If, in the end, we discover that large-scale consumption of diet drinks and foods helped fuel the obesity epidemic, it would be more than ironic. It would be tragic” According to a Scientific Report authored by a panel of 14 MDs, PhDs, PharmDs, and Scholars, “they found a mere seven trials, with a total of only 1,003 people, that evaluated consumption of the substances(non-nutritive sweeteners), for more than six months.”

“The bottom line was that they generally failed to find that sweeteners helped people lose weight. Since most people use sweeteners for the purpose of controlling or losing weight, if they were considered drugs instead of a food substance they would be deemed ineffective based on the best evidence available”

“They [also] found that people who consumed these sweeteners were more likely to have increases in weight and waistline, and a higher incidence of obesity, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events.”

So, this begs the question. Are artificial sweeteners really helping? Moreover, they may even be harmful.